02
Oct 13

How Do You Tell Your Patients That They are Dying?

Earlier today, I saw two of my brain tumor patients follow up in the Neurosurgery outpatient clinic. While both have made good recovery from their operations, their families’ worst fears had just been realized with the piece of paper that they brought with them, bearing the official pathology report stating that the tumor removed from the patient–as suspected from the start–was brain cancer. Continue reading →


14
Sep 13

Lost and Found

Teenager Ofelia Reyes was born with a protuberant, midline fleshy mass at the junction of her lower back and buttocks. When her parents sought consult in PGH during Ofelia’s first month of life, the mass was assessed to be a myelomeningocele.

In this condition, part of the spinal cord and some its nerves, which provide sensation to and move the lower limbs, are exposed on the skin surface because of failure of the bony spine to develop completely. The parents were advised surgery to prevent the mass from rupturing and causing recurrent meningitis, but because of financial constraints, the patient was—as government physicians are wont to write in patient charts—lost to follow up. Continue reading →


04
Aug 13

Waiting, Wanting

The joy of seeing your post-operative patients follow up in the outpatient clinic, feeling much better than before you operated on them, could not outweigh the helplessness you feel whenever you tell the many others waiting in line for their surgery, “Pasensya na po, wala pa po kaming bakanteng kama. Hindi pa po namin kayo maooperahan. Bumalik na lang po kayo pagkatapos ng dalawang linggo kung hindi pa rin po namin kayo tinatawagan.” (I am sorry but we still do not have a hospital bed for you. We cannot schedule your operation yet. Please come back after two weeks if we have not called you by then.)

Continue reading →